The other thing the Symfony does is to correct for "chromatic aberration", an issue which is discussed in this industry publication which quotes one prominent surgeon noting: Cataract surgery with an IOL with an Abbe number greater than that of the natural lens (47) can improve CA, so that our cataract patients could actually experience better vision quality than they did as young adults.

power vision accommodating iol-73

Not everyone achieves this level of near vision with the lens so people shouldn't expect to necessarily get quite as good a result, and should be prepared for the possibility for needing reading glasses at near.

I suspect the fact that I'm comparatively young for cataract surgery, 52, might have something to do with the results.

I figured that at my age I hopefully may be using these lenses for a few decades so it was worth a bit of effort to get a better lens.

This industry publication suggests it might be generally available in the US in a couple of years, and that some US surgeons find it interesting: Packer concurred that the brand new Tecnis Symfony Extended Range of Vision IOL was the most interesting as it represents a new concept for addressing presbyopia that seems to overcome the limitations of multifocal IOLs....

However the studies so far seem to indicate that the Symfony provides better quality intermediate vision.

In addition multifocal lenses reduce contrast sensitivity which is useful for night vision, while reports indicate the Symfony is at least as good as a monofocal lens.

It seemed like a good bet the image quality for distance would be comparable, and perhaps even better, than a monofocal lens, or an accommodating lens.

Although some results for the Crystalens look like it will similarly do well for intermediate while providing some chance at decent near vision, some showed a lower chance of good near, e.g.

There is no perfect lens, so its partly a matter of placing a bet on which might work out well, and I figured that it was better to bet on something that didn't require the accommodation to work (in addition to other concerns regarding problems people have with the Crystalens, though those may be fewer in the newest versions).

I hadn't searched to find the study behind the figure in this presentation, but it notes: that about half of Crystalens patients require reading correction.

That may be in part because as it notes: ' "Pushing” does not equal “Sustaining” '.