A few days later I received an email about mobile phone insurance that the thief had apparently added to my account.

A North Carolina church received an AT&T bill for 17 i Phones purchased by an identity thief.

In December 2015, four suspects were charged with using fake identity documents to purchase i Phones at AT&T stores in Kansas.

Following the checklist, I placed a fraud alert and obtained a free credit report.

I also prepared an identity theft complaint affidavit, which I later printed and took with me to my local police station when I filed a police report.

This post describes my experiences as a victim of ID theft, explains the growing problem of phone account hijacking, and suggests ways consumers and mobile phone carriers can help combat these scams.

My Experiences as a Victim of ID Theft One evening my mobile phone stopped working mid call.

Identity theft reports to the FTC likely represent only the tip of a much larger iceberg.

According to data from the Identity Theft Supplement to the 2014 National Crime Victimization Survey conducted by the U. Department of Justice, less than 1% of identity theft victims reported the theft to the FTC.

I logged in to my online account, changed the password, and added an extra security PIN recommended by the fraud department.