Duo's calling interface only shows a couple of buttons overlaid in circles on top of each other on the bottom left: And there's obviously a red button to end the call in the middle bottom of the screen.If you're on the receiving end of a Duo call, you'll see the recipient before picking up if you both have Knock Knock enabled, and Duo will also show you which network it's currently using for its call.

In today's technology-driven world, "innovation" has become a basic expectation.

IT leaders are tasked with making technical magic, improving customer experience, and boosting the bottom line -- yet often without any increase to the IT budget.

Determining if your organization is an intelligent enterprise or a slow learner may be challenging, but a new index quantifies criteria in terms of data usage, workflow efficiency, and progress toward the Io T.

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If I dare say it, it's the millennial's () approach to video calls.

Once that foundation is built and trust is gained with users, I'm sure Duo will start adding more traditional options and filling the gaps for a more demanding user base.

Audio-only or group video calls aren't yet possible, there's no web or desktop client, no multi-device support, and no way to share what's on your screen for example instead of what you see with your cameras.

But even though these seemed like deal-breakers to me when the app was announced, after using it for a few days, I'd argue that they're secondary features to what Duo is trying to be: an instantaneous way for you to get in touch with someone else as if you were near them.

Transformation is on every IT organization's to-do list, but effectively transforming IT means a major shift in technology as well as business models and culture.