Carbon dating is used to determine the age of biological artifacts up to 50,000 years old.

This belief in long ages for the earth and the evolution of all life is based entirely on the hypothetical and non-empirical Theory of Evolution.

All dating methods that support this theory are embraced, while any evidence to the contrary, e.g. Prior to radiometric dating, evolution scientists used index fossils a.k.a. A paleontologist would take the discovered fossil to a geologist who would ask the paleontologist what other fossils (searching for an index fossil) were found near their discovery.

As stated previously, carbon dating cannot be used on artifacts over about 50,000 years old.

These artifacts have gone through many carbon-14 half-lives, and the amount of carbon-14 remaining in them is miniscule and very difficult to detect.

the global Flood of 2,348 BC) as global catastrophes reset all the radiometric/atomic “clocks” by invalidating the evolutionist’s main dating assumption that there have never been any global catastrophes.

The assumptions are similar to the assumptions used in carbon dating.

When scientists first began to compare carbon dating data to data from tree rings, they found carbon dating provided "too-young" estimates of artifact age.

Scientists now realize that production of carbon-14 has not been constant over the years, but has changed as the radiation from the sun has fluctuated.

These isotopes have longer half-lives and so are found in greater abundance in older fossils.