As the weeks ticked by, the agents gutted software and slogged through subpoenas.Then they finally got a break: A few of the domain names were registered to one Luis Mijangos. Mijangos, assuming that wasn't an alias, lived on a quiet street in Santa Ana, a suburb in Orange County not far from Disneyland.Bookshelves spill with tomes on hacking and programming.

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The agents had worked some of the biggest cases to come through the cyber program, taking down the stalker of ESPN sportscaster Erin Andrews and busting up Operation Phish Phry—one of the largest online fraud rings ever, which netted the crooks about $1.5 million.

But this case was unlike anything they'd encountered before. And while sex was a factor, it wasn't his only motivation. At the FBI offices, the agents comforted Amy, who shook uncontrollably, unable to collect herself.

But that didn't explain how he knew the details of their phone conversations or the physical descriptions of their rooms.

Rogers and Kirkpatrick started with the one thing they knew for certain: the hacker's e-mail.

But what if they It's a question that James Kelly and his girlfriend, Amy Wright, never thought they'd have to entertain. Amy, a 20-year-old brunette at the University of California at Irvine, was on her laptop when she got an IM from a random guy nicknamed mistahxxxrightme, asking her for webcam sex. Amy told the guy off, but he IM'd again, saying he knew all about her, and to prove it he started describing her dorm room, the color of her walls, the pattern on her sheets, the pictures on her walls. It was like Amy'd slipped into a stalker movie. Amy watched in horror as the picture materialized on the screen: a shot of her in that very room, naked on the bed, having webcam sex with James. The hacker fired off a note to James's ex-girlfriend Carla Gagnon: "nice video I hope you still remember this if you want to chat and find out before I put it online hit me up." Attached was a video still of her in the nude. The campus police were in no position to handle a case like this.

Then the hacker contacted James directly, boasting that he had control of his computer, and it became clear this wasn't about sex: He was toying with them. But the instant she phoned the dispatcher, a message chimed on her screen. Whoever devised the malware—a sophisticated program capable of dodging antivirus software—clearly had a leg up on university cops.

Every online scam begins more or less the same—a random e-mail, a sketchy attachment.

But every so often, a new type of hacker comes along. He secretly burrows his way into your hard drive, then into your life. It was a Saturday night, not much happening in her Long Beach, California, neighborhood, so high school senior Melissa Young was home messing around on her computer.

Attached to the note was a file labeled simply SCARY. Yeah, the IM had come from her account, but she hadn't sent it. That night, Suzy's 20-year-old friend Nila Westwood got the same note, the same attachment. When she called her friend to see what she'd missed, things actually got freaky: Suzy'd never sent a thing.