Printing of the Scottish Daily Mail was switched from Edinburgh to the Deansgate plant in Manchester in 1968 and, for a while, The People was also printed on the Mail presses in Deansgate.

In 1987, printing at Deansgate ended and the northern editions were thereafter printed at other Associated Newspapers plants.

On Northcliffe criticised Lord Kitchener, the Secretary of State for War, regarding weapons and munitions.

In 1919, Alcock and Brown made the first flight across the Atlantic, winning a prize of £10,000 from the Daily Mail.

In 1930 the Mail made a great story of another aviation stunt, awarding another prize of £10,000 to Amy Johnson for making the first solo flight from England to Australia.

(For full list see Daily Mail aviation prizes.) Before the outbreak of World War I, the paper was accused of warmongering when it reported that Germany was planning to crush the British Empire.

When war began, Northcliffe's call for conscription was seen by some as controversial, although he was vindicated when conscription was introduced in 1916.

A survey in 2014 found the average age of its reader was 58, and it had the lowest demographic for 15- to 44-year-olds among the major British dailies.

Between July and December 2013 it had an average daily readership of approximately 3.951 million, of whom approximately 2.503 million were in the ABC1 demographic and 1.448 million in the C2DE demographic. On this date it also absorbed the Daily Sketch, which had been published as a tabloid by the same company.

From 1923 Lord Rothermere and the Daily Mail formed an alliance with the other great press baron, Lord Beaverbrook.

Their opponent was the Conservative Party politician and leader Stanley Baldwin.

The main concern of Viscount Rothermere, the current chairman and main shareholder, is that the circulation be maintained.

He testified before a House of Lords select committee that "we need to allow editors the freedom to edit", and therefore the newspaper's editor was free to decide editorial policy, including its political allegiance.

There were 40,000 entries and the winner was a cross between a top hat and a bowler christened the Daily Mail Sandringham Hat.