Yet another way you can differentiate overwork from indifference is the ease with which you are communicating.

If you cannot even talk to your partner on the phone for two minutes at a stretch or if he/she never replies to your emails and text messages, chances are that he/she does not wish to hear from you.

I’m guessing there are other readers out there that feel this way, especially when both people are working in the same field, firm, company, etc.

How do we deal with this competitive nature so that it doesn’t destruct an otherwise perfectly good relationship?

And are some people just too competitive that they might as well find someone in a different field of work?

I’m curious to see what the readers say here, because I never had great experiences dating guys who were as busy as I was.

Let’s also assume that conditions on the day of the interview are identical and, thus, neither you nor the interviewer is in a bad mood because of the weather or some personal trouble.

Oh, and let’s also assume that we all play on an absolutely level playing field, and the interviewer doesn’t have a preference between hiring a woman and a man. Even if this Bizarro World is true, you and your partner can still approach these amazing job opportunities (which of course will come along frequently) in the following ways: I stand by a lot of my tips in the other post, as well — a relationship is nothing without similar lifestyles, and compatible attitudes towards finance.

We recently talked about a job for which we both wanted to apply, and that conversation didn’t really go well.

I almost wish one of us could find a different area of practice, but I don’t think either of us should make that sacrifice.

I will say, though, that in that class — the high-achieving man — it was easiest to recognize when someone had decided it was Time to Get Married because they were much more intense on a first date, and much more direct when they weren’t interested (which actually was appreciated).

(As always, apologies in advance for every time I say “he” or “the guy” — I really just mean the person you’re dating.) It’s important to recognize that there are different levels of togetherness, and not every long-term boyfriend or girlfriend will be a true partner.

Appreciate and support his career and his successes, and those favors & support will be returned. Not always, but often the happier/more satisfied a person is in his/her career, the happier he/she will be in the relationship, so be supportive.